New York Times - Environment

A Strong Case Against a Pesticide Does Not Faze E.P.A. Under Trump
For decades, scientists have warned of mounting evidence that exposure to chlorpyrifos may threaten children’s development.
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In Win for Environmentalists, Senate Keeps an Obama-Era Climate Change Rule
Senators voted 51 to 49 to block a measure that would have undone a regulation to control the release of methane from oil and gas wells on public land.
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By Degrees: A Parable From Down Under for U.S. Climate Scientists
Politics intruded on climate science in Australia. The scientists fought back, led by John Church, a leading world expert on sea level rise.
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E.P.A. Dismisses Members of Major Scientific Review Board
A spokesman for the agency’s administrator said he would consider replacing the academic scientists with representatives from industries the agency is supposed to regulate.
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The New Threat to Wolves in and Around Yellowstone
Packs of the animals, once endangered, have flourished, but biologists worry about the effects of renewed hunting outside the national park.
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Mass Die-Off of Whales in Atlantic Is Being Investigated
Officials are seeking the reason for an “unusual mortality event” that has left 41 humpback whales dead since early 2016 from North Carolina to Maine.
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Trillions of Plastic Bits, Swept Up by Current, Are Littering Arctic Waters
A new study found that a major ocean current is carrying plastic from the North Atlantic to the Greenland and Barents seas, and leaving it there.
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Climate Change Reroutes a Yukon River in a Geological Instant
Melting water from one of Canada’s largest glaciers used to flow north, to the Bering Sea. Last spring, it reversed course, a case of what scientists call “river piracy.”
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Matter: Antarctic Ice Reveals Earth’s Accelerating Plant Growth
Scientists compiling a record of the atmosphere based on air trapped in Antarctic ice found that rising carbon dioxide has accelerated plant growth.
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We Might Soon Resurrect Extinct Species. Is It Worth the Cost?
Scientists disagree about whether bringing extinct species back from the dead will result in a net loss of global biodiversity.
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ScienceDaily - Environment

Researchers have shown that a newly engineered catalyst made of gold nanoparticles supported on a metal oxide framework shows breakdown of ammonia impurities in air, with excellent selectivity for conversion...
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How electricity-eating microbes use electrons to fix carbon dioxide
A phototrophic microbe called Rhodopseudomonas palustris takes up electrons from conductive substances like metal oxides or rust to reduce carbon dioxide.
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Squishing blood stem cells could facilitate harvest for transplants
How deformable cells are, and thus how stiff or squishy they are, plays an important role in retaining blood-forming stem cells in their marrow niches and thus preserving their long-term...
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Tall ice-cliffs may trigger big calving events -- and fast sea-level rise
Glaciers that drain ice sheets such as Antarctica or Greenland often flow into the ocean, ending in near-vertical cliffs. As the glacier flows into the sea, chunks of the ice...
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Current treatments for tuberculosis (TB) are very effective in controlling TB infection caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). They don't, however, always prevent reinfection. Why this happens is one of the...
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Paleontologists report world's biggest Tyrannosaurus rex
Paleontologists have just reported the world's biggest Tyrannosaurus rex and the largest dinosaur skeleton ever found in Canada. The 13-metre-long T. rex, nicknamed 'Scotty,' lived in prehistoric Saskatchewan 66 million...
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More and more products carry ethical labels such as fair-trade or organic, which consumers view positively. Nevertheless, the sales figures of these products often remain low, even though they offer...
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Mitochondria manufacture energy in every cell of the body, including heart muscle cells. A new study shows that cardiac mitochondria are abnormal in the offspring of mouse mothers that become...
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Citizen science programs provide valuable data on intermittent rivers in southwestern US
An OU-led project is showing how citizen science programs provide valuable data on rivers in southwestern United States. The ecological and hydrological data obtained from intermittent rivers (rivers that dry...
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Scientists argue for more comprehensive studies of Cascade volcanoes
Scientists argue for more 'synthesis' research looking at the big picture of volcanology to complement myriad research efforts looking at single volcanoes.
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